Trini Kitty Kaos
Trini Kaos is strong but not tough. She hates being told no. She loves to say yes. She’s always in love. She likes scotch or whiskey, listens to fortune cookies, and collects books indiscriminately. She is a Trinidadian with a temper to match. Some call her pansexual. Some call her queer. She calls herself evenly odd. She feeds on sugar and wishful thinking. She lives in Canada where she works an earnest 24 hr job as a feminist migrant activist and sometimes does burlesque or spoken word on stage—kind of like a superhero with a secret identity. Only not super. Or secret. Chaos tends to be attached to her in a passionate affair.
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❝ Stonewall was colored folks, poor folks, transsexuals, femmes, butches… a little bit of everybody. But the narrative that gets sold to people is that it was all these ‘A-Gay’ white normative people. That’s not who riots. Sorry.

— 

Juba Kalamka in this interview (via soldadera-del-amor)

"that’s not who riots".

(via genderqueerkid)

THANK YOU.  

(via voguingfemme)

THATS NOT WHO RIOTS!! so perfect

(via doorhingeteeth)

(Source: niaking)

houseofalexzander:

Lustrous.

A man in the grocery store line today approached me and said, “Sir, when I first saw you I was extremely attracted to you, but then I noticed that you are a boy. How… I mean, why do you dress so provocatively?”

I responded, “Well, in today’s world the majority of the straight male race view women as objects, or something that belongs to them. I dress provocatively because it attracts the attention of men in a sexual and OBJECTIVE way. However, when realized that I am actually male, they often become confused, disgusted, upset or all of the above. By inflicting this minor emotional damaged upon the ego of a man raised by twisted societal gender norms, maybe, just maybe the individual will think twice before viewing another woman with an objective attitude and sense of belonging. No woman, belongs to ANYONE. Male or female, the equality of human beings needs to be a priority. It is something worth dressing up for.”

I AM NOT KIDDING. The woman behind me, the female cashier, the old lady bagging groceries and the woman in front of me who was talking on the phone STOPPED, …. and proceeded to gasp and clap. The man shook my hand, told me to have a blessed day and then said, “excuse me ladies, I need to visit my daughter.”

…. I was shaking by the time I walked out of the store.

- Elliott Alexzander

❝ 

Depression is hard to understand, because it is not a consistent state. Depression is rather like a virus, but like a virus, it has its manageable days and its acute, life-threatening flare-ups. You can be in a depression and still laugh at a friend’s joke or have a good night at dinner or manage low-level functioning. You grocery shop and stop to pet a puppy on the corner, talk to friends in a café, maybe write something you don’t hate. When this happens, you might examine your day for clues like reading tea leaves in a cup: Was it the egg for breakfast that made the difference? The three-mile run? You think, well, maybe this thing has moved on now. And you make no sudden moves for fear of attracting its abusive attention again.

But other times…

Other times, it’s as if a hole is opening inside you, wider and wider, pressing against your lungs, pushing your internal organs into unnatural places, and you cannot draw a true breath. You are breaking inside, slowly, and everything that keeps you tethered to your life, all of your normal responses, is being sucked through the hole like an airlock emptying into space. These are the times Holly Golightly called the Mean Reds.

I call it White Knuckling it.

— 

Miles and Miles of No Man’s Land, Libba Bray (via babybirched)

"But the stigma of depression is that it comes with the sense that you shouldn’t have it to begin with. That it is self-indulgence or emotional incompetence rather than actual illness."

(via sonchorizos)

whoa.

(via keeperofthehouse)

When it’s White Knuckle Time, you will have to remind yourself to stand in the middle of the subway platform, well away from the edge.”

There is an undertow to depression. It doesn’t take you all at once. It leaves you with some false sense that you are coping. That you are in control. That you have the shore still well in sight, until, at some point, you raise your head to find yourself all alone, battered by rough seas with absolutely no idea which way you should swim.”

 

Jesus, every damn word of this post. It’s remarkable.

(via foulmouthedliberty)

❝ On the morning of October 3, 1991, I woke to the sound of people shouting, “Susan kills babies!” outside our bedroom window. “Susan kills babies!” I heard again. Must be a nightmare, I thought. I’m home. I am not at work. I am in my bed, right next to Randy. But I was awake. I was in my own bed. This was real.

— 

This Common Secret, Susan Wicklund

I remember seeing a video OneThirdGone posted about her group protesting outside a doctor’s home. I rolled my eyes at it and thought of how irritating they were. But after reading about the struggles of Dr. Wicklund and all the harassment she’s endured (and I’m not even halfway through the book yet), anti-choice protestors now make me physically sick.

They barricaded Dr. Wicklund’s home - they brought a mobile home and parked it in front of her driveway, and giant cement-filled barrels blocked the entrance. They stalked her daughter at her school, they posted “Wanted” signs all over their town. They made it nearly impossible for her family to leave their home.

If you think clinic protestors are okay, then I’m going to need you to do some rethinking.

(via provoice)

❝ As terms like womanism, intersectionality, and women of color enter the mainstream, it is important to remember that they do not exist in a vacuum. They were created by Black women to address the ways in which we feel excluded from mainstream feminism. Kimberle Crenshaw, Patricia Hill Collins, Loretta Ross, Audre Lorde, and bell hooks are more than names to pluck convenient quotes from when it suits you. They are Black feminists, and they are part of a long tradition that can be traced back to Ida B. Wells-Barnett and beyond. So when your idea of feminism in 2013 harkens back to the racist, sexist rhetoric thrown at Wells-Barnett by Susan B. Anthony and Frances Willard, then what kind of movement are you trying to build? If your definition of feminism is rooted in Mammy myths, what can be built with you? Are you fighting for equality for all, or your right to be equal in oppressing Black women?

— Mikki Kendall (karnythia), "For Black Women, Everything is a Feminist Issue" (via so-treu)

blackourstory:

WHY DIDN’T THEY TEACH YOU ABOUT THIS IN HISTORY CLASS?

The Christian Movement for Life, aka, MOVE

  • a pro-green, vegan, anti-technology group
  • living in a house in West Philadelphia
  • BOMBED by the Philly PD, from the air, on May 13, 1985
  • YES, 1985!!!
  • the city killed 11 people (5 children), burned down 65 homes in a Black, middle-class, West Philly neighborhood, and caused $50,000,000.00 damage - all to “evict” the group and recover two shotguns
  • You know of Mumia Abu-Jamal (3rd photo from bottom) but did you know he was affiliated with MOVE?
  • Ramona Africa (2nd photo from bottom) and one child survived
  • MOVE leader John Africa was murdered that day

This was not the ONLY time an American city was bombed, btw. The first time, it was ALSO whites bombing Black people. And you want to talk about TERRORISM??? 

And what else don’t you know about your country and it’s treatment of Black people?

Get to Googling… AND Youtubing…

❝ First…. Many Indigenous Nations have calendars which have
been counting the years for a very long time. I am aware that
the calendar of the Mohawk Indian Nation has been counting
the winters for over 33,120 years. This pre-dates the so-called
‘land-bridge’ of the Bering Strait theory, unless, of course, the
Bering Strait scientists decide to move their interestingly illusive
time period for “early migration” of Indians back to 40,000 years!
Many American Indian early histories tell of events that took
place on this Turtle continent (North America) long before any
so-called ice age. But, for political reasons, these histories
have been mostly ignored. You see, the Bering Strait, in truth,
is a theory that was born of the politics and propaganda of
early America. In the midst of the American ‘Manifest Destiny’
social climate, the Bering Strait theory provided a ‘scientific’
means to justify the taking of ancestral Indian lands. In short,
the mythical theory eased the conscience, as it was a way for
land hungry immigrants to believe that, because Indian people
were only ‘recent inhabitants’ of this land , it was not really their
‘homeland’. Therefore Indians were, in their minds, not any more
the ‘original people’ of this land than they were. This was, and
still is, the political power of the infamous ‘Bering Strait theory’.

— 

The B.S. (Bering Strait) Myth
By John Two-Hawks

The Bering Strait Theory was made to make colonialism seem less like exploitation.

(via fwoosh2)

IIRC this was also done in South Africa. the regime said that the “black” africans had only centuries earlier displaced the “brown” africans.

(via brooklyn-nationalist)

(Source: nativecircle.com)

deiselboi:

bitch-media:

report from the National Transgender Discrimination Survey conducted by the National Gay & Lesbian Task Force and the National Center for Transgender Equality, found that transgender people faced double the rate of unemployment of the general population, with 63 percent of the transgender people surveyed reporting they experienced a serious act of discrimination that majorly affected their ability to sustain themselves. These numbers are even worse for trans people of color, especially trans women of color, the deaths of whom have been deemed a “state of emergency.” 

Trans women have been saddled with the responsibility of taking on trans-exclusionary feminists for far too long—but it’s not their issue to deal with alone. 

Read: It’s Time to End the Long History of Feminism Failing Transgender Women by Tina Vasquez at BitchMedia.org.  Type illustrations by Michelle Leigh

Damn right

simpleadviceforsexyliving:

It’s a no pants party! #relationships #sextalk

simpleadviceforsexyliving:

It’s a no pants party! #relationships #sextalk

❝ “If you blame Native American communities for their poverty, remember that the entire continent was stolen from them.
If you blame Black American communities for their relative poverty, remember that Black Americans were stolen from a continent, trafficked, and enslaved for nearly 300 years.
Tell me again about how your family ‘started from nothing’ when they immigrated. Didn’t they start from whiteness? Seems like a pretty good start.
The American Dream required dual genocides, but tell me again about fairness and equal opportunity. Tell me about democracy, modeled after the Iroquois Confederacy. Tell me your proud heritage, and I will show you the violence that made it so.”
— (via nativnuance)

— 

via Kim Katrin Crosby 

Keynote Speaker for LGBTQ History Month at Dartmouth, on September 30, 2013 

https://www.facebook.com/kim.k.crosby

(via biggreenmicroaggressions)

❝ Loving someone
who hates themselves
is a special kind of violence,
a fight inside the bones,
a war within the blood.

— Yrsa Daley-Ward ‘A steady, blunt Self Harm.’ (via thiswillnotlast)

Top 10 sexist moments in Caribbean Politics

redforgender:

Discussions on penis size in parliament, women told to dress better to avoid rape, boasting about beating your girlfriend till your hand hurt, calls for capital punishment for women who use birth control and a lot more in this HALL OF SHAME. Check out the Top 10 sexist moments in Caribbean politics by CODE RED for gender justice! Follow us on twitter @redforgender

❝ they called her witch because she knew how to heal herself.

— Here We Are, Reflections of A God Gone Mad (2nd edition)

(Source: tevsmith)