Trini Kitty Kaos
Trini Kaos is strong but not tough. She hates being told no. She loves to say yes. She’s always in love. She likes scotch or whiskey, listens to fortune cookies, and collects books indiscriminately. She is a Trinidadian with a temper to match. Some call her pansexual. Some call her queer. She calls herself evenly odd. She feeds on sugar and wishful thinking. She lives in Canada where she works an earnest 24 hr job as a feminist migrant activist and sometimes does burlesque or spoken word on stage—kind of like a superhero with a secret identity. Only not super. Or secret. Chaos tends to be attached to her in a passionate affair.
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The Problem with "Privilege"

Not entirely sure how i feel about this as some folks are definitely still needing work on recognizing their personal privilege even exists… but definitely interesting read.

"Rather, the point of this analysis is to illustrate the larger dynamics by which racialized and colonized peoples are even seen and understood in the first place."

Racists Very Upset Over Interracial Family in Cute Cheerios Commercial

Dear Liberal Allies – what your college courses on oppression didn’t tell you

trungles:

I’m not angry or upset about anything in particular at the moment, but I thought I’d take a little time to write something out that had been bugging me about allies. It’s certainly not all-encompassing or totally comprehensive, but it’s something I’ve been thinking about in terms…

Self care list: how to take care of your self while learning about oppression (with unaware people)

fabianromero:

This is not a complete list and feel free to suggest anything. I recognize that I hold privilege for having the time and energy to put this together, and hope that my footprint in the world leads to more people of color and marginalized people going through this and utilizing…

AfraFemme: The “When” is Huge (Ally)

racismschool:

I see a lot of questions around “When” an ally should speak up. I would never be able to go over each and every possible scenario but I can give you a few rules of thumb. As with most “ally” discussions this can often be applied to other areas but in keeping with theme, this…

mehreenkasana:

Made some cards for orientalist, racist, Islamophobic people.

Pew pew pew.

❝ Calling something exotic emphasizes its distance from the reader. We don’t refer to things as exotic if we think of them as ordinary. We call something exotic if it’s so different that we see no way to emulate it or understand how it came to be. We call someone exotic if we aren’t especially interested in viewing them as people — just as objects representing their culture.

— Fantasy author N. K. Jemisin on The Unexotic Exotic (via thebooksmugglers)

pussyp0wer:

superqueerartsyblog:

Did this about two weeks ago, but I didn’t have time to upload it haha.
Speaks for itself. Oh, this kind of people.

Fuck a tear, we’d be throwing down.

pussyp0wer:

superqueerartsyblog:

Did this about two weeks ago, but I didn’t have time to upload it haha.

Speaks for itself. Oh, this kind of people.

Fuck a tear, we’d be throwing down.

(Source: sirpaahdin.deviantart.com)

❝ I don’t like this expression “First World problems.” It is false and it is condescending. Yes, Nigerians struggle with floods or infant mortality. But these same Nigerians also deal with mundane and seemingly luxurious hassles. Connectivity issues on your BlackBerry, cost of car repair, how to sync your iPad, what brand of noodles to buy: Third World problems. All the silly stuff of life doesn’t disappear just because you’re black and live in a poorer country. People in the richer nations need a more robust sense of the lives being lived in the darker nations. Here’s a First World problem: the inability to see that others are as fully complex and as keen on technology and pleasure as you are.

— 

Teju Cole on the “#firstworldproblems” meme, in a series of tweets compiled by Alexis Madrigal (via chaplinnn)

This is the sort of thing I was referring to the other day!

(via dailymurf)

(Source: occupiedterritories)

azaadiart:

snapss to this!
khushhh:

rebj:

Brown Girl Magazine: Menstruation - Shame & Joy
I know there are many more sides to this issue. I know women are celebrated and respected in India and Hinduism for their fertility and not all women feel ashamed of their menstrual cycle or even adhere to the ancient traditions described above. But as Sarita Manu mentions in the conclusion of her blog, it will take more than education or awareness to stop thinking of menstruation as an impure process.
also: Pure or (Im)pure? 

In many South Asian households, discussing menstruation or mentioning it all is taboo. We can’t know our bodies and or reclaim them without feeling comfortable talking about this beautiful process that’s demonized. Many become blinded from themselves, from how their bodies work & from creating a relationship with it. They become detached from themselves & self pleasure is never made a route, contributing more to their desexualization.

azaadiart:

snapss to this!

khushhh:

rebj:

Brown Girl Magazine: Menstruation - Shame & Joy

I know there are many more sides to this issue. I know women are celebrated and respected in India and Hinduism for their fertility and not all women feel ashamed of their menstrual cycle or even adhere to the ancient traditions described above. But as Sarita Manu mentions in the conclusion of her blog, it will take more than education or awareness to stop thinking of menstruation as an impure process.

also: Pure or (Im)pure? 

In many South Asian households, discussing menstruation or mentioning it all is taboo. We can’t know our bodies and or reclaim them without feeling comfortable talking about this beautiful process that’s demonized. Many become blinded from themselves, from how their bodies work & from creating a relationship with it. They become detached from themselves & self pleasure is never made a route, contributing more to their desexualization.

❝ A major flaw in all of our nation’s powerful movements for social justice has been and remains the assumption that liberation will take place in one fell swoop. That has been detrimental to progress simply because once certain gains in the direction of equality were achieved, the struggle stopped.

— bell hooks (via cuntflavor)

fuckyeahfeminists:

bidyke:

The Revolution Starts at Home - in PDF!
EPIC WIN.

http://www.incite-national.org/media/docs/0985_revolution-starts-at-home.pdf

fuckyeahfeminists:

bidyke:

The Revolution Starts at Home - in PDF!

EPIC WIN.

http://www.incite-national.org/media/docs/0985_revolution-starts-at-home.pdf